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Early forecasts for the total solar eclipse now show a higher probability of clouds threatening parts of the South and Great Lakes, while the Northeast and New England trend in the right direction with an improving outlook for less cloud coverage.

On April 8th, a total solar eclipse will be visible across parts of Mexico, Canada and the U.S., from Texas to Maine. A total solar eclipse happens when the Moon passes between the Sun and the Earth, completely blocking the face of the Sun for several minutes. It will be the last time a total solar eclipse passes over a large part of the U.S. until 2044.

To experience the full eclipse, you’ll need a pair of solar glasses and to be located along the more than 100-mile-wide path during totality. A clear sky is also key to watching a total solar eclipse

The FOX Forecast Center has put together the color-coded map below using a mix of cloud cover climatology and some early computer forecast model indicators, showing areas more or less likely to be impacted by cloud cover during the eclipse. As the eclipse nears, computer forecast models will improve and be able to give forecasters a better idea of what the sky will look like on the big day.

The eclipse cloud cover forecast from FOX Weather.
(FOX Weather)


 

PLANNING AN ECLIPSE ROAD TRIP? AAA SHARES TRAVEL ADVICE, SAFETY TIPS AHEAD OF APRIL 8TH

In its updated forecast Sunday morning, the FOX Forecast Center said the trend for clearer skies is improving at the northeastern end of the path of totality but is getting worse for clouds at the southwestern end of the eclipse path. For now, clouds remain most probable around the Great Lakes and Gulf Coast, with greater confidence in less cloud cover around Florida and New England. 

Much of the prime viewing spots of Texas through the mid-Mississippi and Ohio valleys are currently in the yellow category, indicating lower confidence in cloud cover impacts this early in the forecast. The details will become clearer as the event draws closer, so stay tuned, the FOX Forecast Center said.

WHAT HAPPENS TO CLOUDS DURING A SOLAR ECLIPSE? NEW RESEARCH MAY SURPRISE YOU

We can also look at cloud climatology data to see where clouds are more likely to cover the eclipse on April 8th. The map below shows the cloud cover averages over the past 30 years. 

It’s also important to note that even if it’s cloudy, you will likely still see at least some of the eclipse. 

Cloud cover averages on April 8th based on 30 years of data.
(FOX Weather)


 

HOW TO SAFELY WATCH A SOLAR ECLIPSE

A more detailed forecast will be available once we get within about a week of the eclipse.

Check back with FOX Weather for updates to the forecast as April 8th approaches, and add your viewing location to the “Events” tab in the FOX Weather app.

Editor’s note: This story has been updated to remove a graphic that wasn’t ready for publication.

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